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Thread: Putting wires over a road?

  1. #1
    Regular Member Ste's Avatar
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    Default Putting wires over a road?

    A mate of mine has his garage across the road from his house.

    If he wanted to get main electrical power into his garage, does anyone know the laws on him stringing supported wires across the road? Ie what type of wiring would be needed and at what height, and any other legal obligations he must observe?


    TIA

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    I don't think he's going to be in much luck there...

    I'm having a hard enough time with regulations and I'm only running a cable to my girlfriends garage, 5 yards across her own back garden.

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    [Ex]Admin Duncan's Avatar
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    Hmm, interesting question! If he's going over a public road - which I assume it this - then I bet there are regulations/restrictions etc. Maybe a question for the council. At the very least I would expect there is a minimum height that they can be at, and I bet that height is quite high.

    I have a feeling it's something he simply wouldn't be allowed to do. It'd be a minefield for litigation if not done properly - plus it'd set a precedent for every one else in the street with garages to say that they want to do the same, which the council would probably rather want to avoid.

    Be interesting to see replies from people who've got specific knowledge/experience.

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    [Ex]Admin Duncan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DNS View Post
    I'm having a hard enough time with regulations and I'm only running a cable to my girlfriends garage, 5 yards across her own back garden.
    Really? In what way? Curious as that's how our garage gets it's power - wire cable between house and garage with the power cable attached to it. That's how it was when we moved in and I've always planned on burying under the verge that runs along the fence line - not sure why the previous owners didn't do that in the first place TBH!

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    Regular Member m8internet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ste View Post
    A mate of mine has his garage across the road from his house.
    If he wanted to get main electrical power into his garage, does anyone know the laws on him stringing supported wires across the road? Ie what type of wiring would be needed and at what height, and any other legal obligations he must observe?
    You really need to contact the local mains electrical supplier in the area
    They will then conduct a survey and then quote for various options

    If the live wires are going across a road then this opens a hornets nest of regulations and requirements
    The more practical option is to have a direct underground supply

    I wouldn't expect much change from £5000 for a new supply

    Contact the local mains electrical supplier and provide them with :
    A copy of the local street plan showing the location of the property.
    A copy of the house or building plan showing where you would like the meter
    Details of the how much electricity you will need
    A daytime contact number

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    Administrator Big-Pete's Avatar
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    I was just about to put me wiring regs books away untill after Xmas aswell..
    This info is from the latest NICEIC Technical Manual, and as such is relevant to all jobs designed after 1st July 2008 (17th edition)

    Hope this helps your mate out..

    If you need any further info let me know, you may have to contact the council if going over a public road due to wayleaves over their property ie:- public roads & footpaths etc..

    1. General
    The basic requirements for the support of cables are given in Regulations 522.8.4 and 522.8.5 of BS 7671.
    In particular, cables should be supported in such a way that they will not be exposed to undue mechanical strain, including any strain caused by their own weight, and that there is no appreciable mechanical strain on the terminations of the conductors.
    Where a cable is supported at intervals, rather than continuously, the intervals should be appropriate to meet the above requirements for avoidance of strain.
    2. Selection of the means of support
    BS 7671 does not stipulate the particular means by which cables should be supported, but leaves this to be dictated by the needs of the installation concerned. However, a number of essential requirements need to be met, some examples of which are:
    (i) Surfaces in contact with a cable. All surfaces in contact with a cable must be reasonably smooth and free from sharp corners or edges likely to damage the cable (Regulation 522.8.1). This applies to cable clips, parts of a wiring system (such as conduit and cable tray) and parts of a building (such as walls, ceilings and floors).
    (ii) Suitability for external influences. Cable supports and their fixings, like any other parts of a wiring system, must be selected so as to be suitable for the external influences they are likely to be exposed to at their location (Section 522). For example, where vibration is likely to occur, locking arrangements such as shakeproof washers are likely to be required.
    (iii) Avoiding electrolytic corrosion. Metallic cable clips, support systems (such as cable tray), cable sheaths and armour etc, of dissimilar metals between which electrolytic corrosion is liable to occur, should not be placed in contact with each other (Regulation 522.5.2 refers). Such corrosion is possible between, for example, zinc (as used in galvanizing) and copper, especially in the presence of moisture.
    (iv) Safety services. The fire resistance of cable supports and fixings for a cable of a safety service (such as a fire alarm system) must be such that the cable provides the required level of fire resistance (Regulation 560.8.1). The cable manufacturer’s recommendations should be followed.
    (v) Non-sheathed cables must be enclosed in conduit etc. Non-sheathed cables for fixed wiring are required by Regulation 521.10.1 to be enclosed in conduit, ducting or trunking. The requirement does not apply to a protective conductor complying with Section 543 of BS 7671. However, where the protective conductor belongs to an a.c. circuit installed in a ferrous enclosure (such as steel conduit, trunking or ducting) the protective conductor must be installed in the same enclosure in order to meet the requirements of Regulation 521.5.2 relating to electromagnetic effects.
    (vi) Cables in a vertical run of trunking or ducting exceeding 5 m in length. For cables of any type in a vertical run of trunking or ducting exceeding 5 m in length, intermediate cable supports (such as pin racks in trunking, should be provided.


    Section 5. Overhead cables between buildings

    Table 2 (see picture) gives suggested maximum lengths of span and minimum heights for overhead wiring linking buildings etc in order to meet the requirements of BS 7671 referred to in item 1 of this topic.
    The minimum height dimensions in Table 2 apply only to the general case. They do not apply to special cases, such as yacht marinas, construction sites and agricultural and horticultural locations, for which special consideration is required and considerably increased minimum cable heights may be necessary.
    Table 2.
    Maximum lengths of span and minimum heights for overhead wiring linking buildings etc Wiring system Maximum span Metres




    a Suspension point heights must be chosen to allow for the sag between supports.

    b Greater heights than given in the table will be necessary in certain cases, such as where cranes may be present.

    c The ‘inaccessible to traffic’ column does not apply at agricultural premises.

    d ‘hofr’ means heat and oil resisting, flame retardant.

    e The conduit should be of not less than 20 mm in diameter and not jointed in its span.

    f A minimum height of 5.2 m is permitted for an existing overhead line (but not where refurbished or rebuilt).



    A suspended cable or catenary must be allowed to sag, as shown in Fig 4, in order that the tension (or pulling force) in it should not be unacceptably great. The tension depends on the weight per metre of the cable or catenary and the distance between suspension points, and is greater the smaller the maximum sag.
    To allow for the sag, the heights of cable suspensions need to be greater than the minimum height required for the cable above the ground. Where the suspension points are at the same height, the point at which the maximum sag occurs will be midway between suspensions. With suspension points at different heights, the point of maximum sag will be off centre towards the lower suspension.
    Cable sag
    Last edited by Big-Pete; 24th December 2008 at 13:50.

  7. #7
    [Ex]Admin Duncan's Avatar
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    Come on Pete, could you not have given a comprehensive answer?!

    That's interesting reading. So the minimum height over a road would be 5.2m then? How would you deal with placing the supports then? - would that requirement basically rule out running a cable over the road as the council probably won't let you place a pole on the garage side?

  8. #8
    Administrator Big-Pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan View Post
    Come on Pete, could you not have given a comprehensive answer?!

    That's interesting reading. So the minimum height over a road would be 5.2m then? How would you deal with placing the supports then? - would that requirement basically rule out running a cable over the road as the council probably won't let you place a pole on the garage side?
    How would i know..

    Only joking... (goes to get the Technical manual out again... )
    Last edited by Big-Pete; 24th December 2008 at 14:09.

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    Administrator Big-Pete's Avatar
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    I think the norm would be to use a steel catenary wire which is fixed to both buildings (if the garage is 5m high it won't need a pole) and then the new supply ty-raped to it..
    Last edited by Big-Pete; 24th December 2008 at 14:18.

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    Heres the Table used for cable spacing and support fixings dependant on type and size of cable..



    a For flat type cables, the diameter refers to the major axis (see Fig 2).

    b Spacings smaller than given in the table will often be necessary for good workmanship/visual appearance.

    c Horizontal spacings include for runs at an angle of up to 60° from the horizontal.

    d Vertical spacings include for runs at an angle of up to 30° from the vertical.
    Last edited by Big-Pete; 24th December 2008 at 14:41.

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